Sep 01
@ 11:02pm

theotherwesley:

Me getting up in the morning like 

Hittin’ the keyboard like

Friends comin’ online like



DID YOu SEE tHE THINGg MY GOD

Aug 31
@ 11:41pm
typette:

excuse me while I go collect 3 more stickers so I can get dancing lessons to go to Cinderella’s Ball, by killing ghosts and collecting teacups wearing sneakers and a ball gown with my KICK ASS CRYSTAL MAGIC WAND.
I bought this “Disney’s Magical World” game on a whim and it turns out it’s like 4 times the game ACNL is, it’s AWESOME: somewhere between tomodachi life, ACNL, any LOZ-ish game, mario 64, and harvest moon. It’s like, what stars are in mario 64, stickers are in this game- so there’s platforming elements and dungeon-crawling elements and harvest/mining/searching/etc elements. It’s brilliant. 
I’m totally not lying. Seriously, would I embarrass myself and admit this to you all if I wasn’t 100% confident with what I’m saying? god I haven’t put it down for like 3 days


This game is SO MUCH FUN. Everybody should draw their magical princess/prince :D

typette:

excuse me while I go collect 3 more stickers so I can get dancing lessons to go to Cinderella’s Ball, by killing ghosts and collecting teacups wearing sneakers and a ball gown with my KICK ASS CRYSTAL MAGIC WAND.

I bought this “Disney’s Magical World” game on a whim and it turns out it’s like 4 times the game ACNL is, it’s AWESOME: somewhere between tomodachi life, ACNL, any LOZ-ish game, mario 64, and harvest moon. It’s like, what stars are in mario 64, stickers are in this game- so there’s platforming elements and dungeon-crawling elements and harvest/mining/searching/etc elements. It’s brilliant. 

I’m totally not lying. Seriously, would I embarrass myself and admit this to you all if I wasn’t 100% confident with what I’m saying? god I haven’t put it down for like 3 days

This game is SO MUCH FUN. Everybody should draw their magical princess/prince :D

Aug 31
@ 06:09pm
Tags
words of wisdom
Reblogged

typette
typette:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:



mirrepp:





Some harsh but very very true words





 When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.
"this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…"
"this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…"
"there is better stuff on later pages…"
It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.
But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”
You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.
This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 
Be proud.



 This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

 The piece of advice I got that helped me the most with this is; the people looking at your work be it your director or an HR person, trust them to know and see the good work there that you’ve become desensitized to. We all have rushed shots and stuff, they can see the polished diamond inside of a rock, it’s literally their job! So don’t fret too much!
» view in high-res

typette:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words


When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.


This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.


The piece of advice I got that helped me the most with this is; the people looking at your work be it your director or an HR person, trust them to know and see the good work there that you’ve become desensitized to. We all have rushed shots and stuff, they can see the polished diamond inside of a rock, it’s literally their job! So don’t fret too much!

source: mirrepp
Aug 31
@ 05:55pm
Best game ever!!

Best game ever!!

Aug 23
@ 10:38pm

gravi-teamfalls:

BG paint for “Into the Bunker”  Top image drawn by Ian Worrel, painted by Jeffrey Thompson. Bottom three images drawn & painted by Art Director Ian Worrel

Uuuuugghhh I love Gravity Falls scenery so much. So much. I must learn from it.

Aug 23
@ 10:36pm

zambiunicorn:

froth:

faultyschematic:

sasaq:

(via tomoka.s @mochim2323 | Instagram)

look at this idiot

it’s wonderful

okay I liked this yesterday (complete with actual physical squeaking sounds and face-touching) but it’s been on my dash three times now so I have to reblog it before I have a heart attack

kiniesss

birb

Aug 23
@ 10:34pm
glassshard:

kierongillen:

rstevens:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

truth. i always try to make my mouth shapes logical.

My odd art choice i mainstream comics is people talking as they’re kissing. That’s just rude, in my experience, and it ends up all mumbly.

This never really bothered me. That panel of the character talking is just a snapshot; a slice of the seconds it takes them to get out whatever they’re saying.
Imagine you have a character saying: “My name is Bob.” Well, what part of the sentence are you going to use to inform how you draw their mouth? The lip curled into the nose to shape the ‘n’? The lips pursed and cheeks puffed to form the ‘b’? The compressed lips of the ‘m’ in ‘my’ or the wide open mouth of the vowel that follows? Or will you do the closed mouth second of time before or after the phrase?
To me, any of those are valid because they’re part of the slice of time that panel is illustrating. A character with a speech bubble and a closed mouth in a panel isn’t “talking with their mouth closed.” The artist has just picked that fraction of a second in their physical act of speaking where their mouth is not hanging open.
It’s like any physical action, like a punch, say. Often it works better to show the wind-up, and then the effect, and not the fist hitting face itself. Does this mean the punch didn’t happen because you didn’t see it?
Anyway, I think a closed mouth is valid in a panel for a speaking character, especially if it adds to the expression you’re going for. Why take that option out of your toolbox for no good reason?

People seem bothered by this more and more lately. I have to agree that it’s a viable option for an artist. It can help add a little variety to speaking scenes, and a closed mouth can be just as expressive as an open one.
But I think it should be used sparingly. I’ve read a few comics where 95% of the time the mouth is closed when speaking (in a complete reversal of the norm) and it becomes uncomfortably blatant and distracting. As long as it’s not overused, I don’t see why it should be avoided.
Though, I suppose it could also depend on what is being said. In this particular example image there’s really no sound that requires the lips to be closed (such as an M or a B) so the visual is subconsciously clashing with the dialogue.
But maybe that’s just me :B
» view in high-res

glassshard:

kierongillen:

rstevens:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

truth. i always try to make my mouth shapes logical.

My odd art choice i mainstream comics is people talking as they’re kissing. That’s just rude, in my experience, and it ends up all mumbly.

This never really bothered me. That panel of the character talking is just a snapshot; a slice of the seconds it takes them to get out whatever they’re saying.

Imagine you have a character saying: “My name is Bob.” Well, what part of the sentence are you going to use to inform how you draw their mouth? The lip curled into the nose to shape the ‘n’? The lips pursed and cheeks puffed to form the ‘b’? The compressed lips of the ‘m’ in ‘my’ or the wide open mouth of the vowel that follows? Or will you do the closed mouth second of time before or after the phrase?

To me, any of those are valid because they’re part of the slice of time that panel is illustrating. A character with a speech bubble and a closed mouth in a panel isn’t “talking with their mouth closed.” The artist has just picked that fraction of a second in their physical act of speaking where their mouth is not hanging open.

It’s like any physical action, like a punch, say. Often it works better to show the wind-up, and then the effect, and not the fist hitting face itself. Does this mean the punch didn’t happen because you didn’t see it?

Anyway, I think a closed mouth is valid in a panel for a speaking character, especially if it adds to the expression you’re going for. Why take that option out of your toolbox for no good reason?

People seem bothered by this more and more lately. I have to agree that it’s a viable option for an artist. It can help add a little variety to speaking scenes, and a closed mouth can be just as expressive as an open one.

But I think it should be used sparingly. I’ve read a few comics where 95% of the time the mouth is closed when speaking (in a complete reversal of the norm) and it becomes uncomfortably blatant and distracting. As long as it’s not overused, I don’t see why it should be avoided.

Though, I suppose it could also depend on what is being said. In this particular example image there’s really no sound that requires the lips to be closed (such as an M or a B) so the visual is subconsciously clashing with the dialogue.

But maybe that’s just me :B

source: scarygoround
Aug 21
@ 09:33pm
Nnnnnffffhh… Okay, I give. I really want this Zelf. It’s super limited edition and the chances of finding it are totally random.
If anybody finds one and wants to trade for art or merchandise or something I’m game. Just don’t hesitate to grab it immediately, then we can barter for it (they retail for around $6).
Zelfs are sold only at Toys ‘R’ Us (and possibly Books-A-Million). Please keep an eye out for me ;^;
» view in high-res

Nnnnnffffhh… Okay, I give. I really want this Zelf. It’s super limited edition and the chances of finding it are totally random.

If anybody finds one and wants to trade for art or merchandise or something I’m game. Just don’t hesitate to grab it immediately, then we can barter for it (they retail for around $6).

Zelfs are sold only at Toys ‘R’ Us (and possibly Books-A-Million). Please keep an eye out for me ;^;

Aug 19
@ 10:40pm

This seems like a really fun game that could use some more backers before it ends in 45 hours. Please check it out!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/mografi/jenny-leclue-a-handmade-adventure-game

Aug 19
@ 08:30pm
Tags
scenic route
Reblogged

xfreischutz

kavaeric:

idontlikeyourcat:

stop-being-human:

fleeting-things:

rhamphotheca:

Beautiful photos of abandoned places.

THIS IS WHAT THE WHOLE WORLD WOULD BE LIKE IN A ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE.

What the fuck is the huge hole in the first one?!!!

My soul

in seriousness though the top picture is the bottom of an abandoned nuclear cooling tower

Stuff like this always stirs my soul.

source: amroyounes

littlecelesse.com

This is my personal blog. Find my art-only blog here.